TATTOO vs HEALTH vs FAT

By 19th September 2015Blog

In this topic I really want to explore if tattoos can actually make you fat or at least be one of the many causes leading to becoming fat, obese and just plain unhealthy.

All tattoos are unique containing different colours of ink which all contain different types of chemicals, different volumes of ink and different methods of tattooing done by different artists.

WHAT IS IN TATTOO INK?

What most people don’t actually realise is that the brightly coloured inks contain toxins like Cadmium, Chromium or even Lead, which are created from compounds that mostly use heavy metals, containing Copper or Cobalt.

The best part is, is that no one actually knows how some of these inks are made or what is in them, in fact you can buy tattoo inks online seen for as little as £3!

When looking for a tattoo parlour you always want best conditions like being ‘sterile’; however in most cases you’re pretty much going to have heavy metals injected into what is the largest organ of your body – the skin!

INK AND MERCURY: THE SECOND MOST POISONOUS METAL TO HUMANS

Some red inks are used for permanent tattoos, which contain mercury, while other reds may contain different heavy metals like cadmium or iron oxide. These metals give tattoo their ‘permanence’ in the skin and have been known to cause allergic reactions, eczema and scarring. Mercury is also found in dental fillings and some fish such as tuna. Whilst red ink causes the most problems, most other colours of standard tattoo ink are also derived from the heavy metals above and also including antimony, beryllium, nickel and arsenic, which can also cause severe skin reactions to some people.

TOXINS AND TOXICITY MAKE US FAT

According to research and this will depend on what research you read, in the last 60 years approximately 87,000 man-made chemicals have been introduced into our food and water supplies, which raises a question, what do these toxins do to our bodies over a period of time?

  • Pesticides and herbicides
  • Plastics, Bisphenol A and Phthalates (BPA)
  • Vaccinations and antibiotics
  • Cow’s milk
  • Plastic fats: margarine
  • Heavy metals
  • Flame retardants
  • EMFs, mobile and Wi-Fi exposure
  • Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) non-stick cookware
  • Cosmetics, fragrances and make-up
  • Water fluoridation (tap water)
  • Genetically modified (GM) foods
  • Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) in processed foods
  • Additives and sweeteners: aspartame
  • Amalgam fillings: contain mercury

These areas are all contributing factors towards becoming fat, which means there is never just one single cause for becoming fat and obese, so ideally we all need to stay as close to mother nature as possible in order to stay lean and healthy.

Well one thing is certain, worldwide obesity continues to increase. Increasing environmental toxicity and synthetic chemicals have in the last two decades caused havoc with our hormones which prevent us from using our fat stores to burn fat and instead, stimulate us to store more fat. The chemical damage appears to make people less able to raise their body temperature, meaning if you produce less heat you end up using less energy (hypothyroidism) which is a potentially dangerous health condition that occurs when the production, conversion, or action of the thyroid hormones in your body is inhibited, which results in too few active thyroid hormones in your blood, which we need to help our bodies burn fat.

Basically thyroid function is all about basal temperature and increased conversation of energy (ATP), which powers all the metabolic functions of the cell. In that process and conversation a large % of energy is released as heat. So body temperature is a good measure of basal metabolic rate activity.

‘There is now very strong evidence that our bodies mistake certain man-made chemicals used in plastics, food, wrappers, and fragrances which do not help us to regulate the production storage of fat cells’ Meaning our bodies just simply do not know what to do with the chemicals apart from store them as fat!

So as you can see, toxins like tattoo inks made from heavy metals could actually be one of the causes to weight gain and lead to obesity, especially if you have are not preventing many of the other causes that help aid this. It’s just another piece to the puzzle!

WHERE IS BEST TO HAVE A TATTOO?

When thinking of getting a tattoo be sure to think about where on your body can stretch like during pregnancy. Stretching can have an adverse effect on the skin and cause the texture of the skin itself to change, equally just as much as gaining weight especially if gaining over 30bls which can also distort the tattoo.

REMEMBER SKIN MOVES

Your skin is alive and moves with time so when collagen also moves, so does the shape and size of the tattoo. I’m sure you have seen that 60-year-old with a blurry, dull black tattoo, with lighter colours faded due to UV light exposure.

LASER TATTOO REMOVAL

How it works is that the laser delivers extremely short pulses of light energy, which penetrates the skin and hits the ink directly, selectively absorbing the light without destroying the surrounding tissue. Skin types will vary, as the darker the pigment in the skin, the harder the light can be attracted to the ink and not to the skin pigment instead.

After the ink absorbs the light, the ink shatters into tiny particles that are then harmlessly cleared by the body’s natural immune system in the following weeks. The white blood cells in your body will collect the ink particles; take them to the lymph-nodes and then transport them through the intestine.

The breakdown of heavy metals within the tattoo can be quiet serious, as the detoxification process involves the liver, which essentially takes all the strain of toxins when excreted from the body.

Did you know, mercury for example is used in most amalgam fillings for your teeth, and it has been known to be found in cheaply made tattoo inks which is the second most poisonous metal to humans?

Scientific research has demonstrated that mercury even in small amounts can damage the brain, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, thryroid, pirtuitary and adrenal glands and also the cells, enzymes and hormones, suppressing the body’s immune system. After care for tattoo removal is essential to help prevent any health risk from the metals in the ink which could lead to poisoning the body.

It has been estimated that 45 million people in the U.S have at least one tattoo which are now more commonly being removed for reasons such as splitting up with your ex, previous gang involvement, coming out of prison which could affect job interviews and of course those who went out painting the town red and decided to paint themselves.

My advice would be to have a serious think before rushing into getting a tattoo, as not only could it lead to general health concerns but also heavy metal poisoning and even weight gain. Think about your career too as some work places will not allow tattoos such as the police officers, airline staff, law firms, teachers and especially if you are thinking of working for the government.

HEAVY METAL DETOXING

Detoxing your body with plenty of clean water and the supplementation of chlorella, spirulina, cilantro and modified citrus pectin will help the body to gently excrete heavy metals such as mercury, arsenic, cadmium and lead, which are also connected to a host of other health problems in people. A detox supplement like ‘greens’ can and will help this process, especially if you are having a tattoo removed.